Reading: The Grandmother with 30,000 Instagram Followers

Second Acts

The Grandmother with 30,000 Instagram Followers

Honey Good wants women after 50 to feel vital, visible, and connected

By Catherine LeFebvre

Honey Good influencer
Honey walking her Wheaten Terrier, America Good, in Chicago.

Becoming a lifestyle blogger and bona fide Instagram influencer wasn’t exactly Susan “Honey” Good’s plan for life after 50. She was incredibly busy traveling, playing golf, and doing charity work, but realized she wanted a new purpose in life.

“Instead of staying in my niche,” Honey says, “I shifted. I kept a journal for three months on the recommendation of a woman I met serendipitously. I loved doing it, and decided to turn it into a website where I put my musings daily.”

The website took off, and Honey Good, the hip 21st-century grandmother thousands of women over 50 turn to, found her second act. Her site mixes fashion and beauty advice with posts on spirituality and aging meaningfully. On Facebook and Instagram, Honey’s amassed over 150,000 followers combined, and she’s had fun defining her brand there.

“I’m an explorer, an adventurer, a person who has weathered many ups and downs, Honey says. “I moved my whole family to Honolulu. I was widowed in my 40s. I weathered cancer and survived. I’ve been involved with suicide. But even after all of the bad things, I got myself and my family to the sunny side of the street.”

Stories for my Grandchild Honey GoodThis buoyancy can be seen in her new book, Stories for My Grandchild, out today. It’s a keepsake journal full of quotes and writing prompts from Honey, tailored to a contemporary woman’s life. With it, grandmothers can write their own story, in their own handwriting, and pass it down to their ‘grands,’ as Honey calls them.

“The book is so fabulous because it’s not about me. It’s about grandmothers all over the world. I’m more or less partnering with all the grandmothers,” Honey says.  

It fits into her overall mission to make women after 50 feel vital, and most importantly, visible. Honey says that while so many women feel loved by their family and are satisfied in general with their place in life, they just don’t feel seen. It wasn’t something she struggled with personally, and she wondered why so many of the amazing women she knew felt this way.   

“I kept thinking of this word ‘invisible’ every day when I would walk my dog,” Honey says. “Do you feel invisible when you walk into a restaurant? When you go into Barney’s? [And the answer was] no, because I feel relevant. Because I do things for myself.”

And that’s what Honey is dedicated to helping her friends achieve too. All 150,000 of them.

 

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